Foot Care For You"Foot Surgery is a last resort, not first aid."- Dr. Burton Schuler
1976

Dr. Burton Schuler
Podiatrist - Foot Specialist - Foot Doctor
2401 W. 15th Street
Panama City, FL 32401

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    Home Heating Devices for your painful sore hurting feet & heels.

    Sore-feet-heels, paraffin-bath- Compliments "Why You Really Hurt" by Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist-Panama City-Fl

    Paraffin bath, simply heating device to help your sore feet and heels

    Authored by Dr. Burton S. Schuler,
    Click here to read the Google reviews about Dr. Schuler

    In my previous article entitled Sore Feet  Best Treated by Heat not Ice says Podiatrist  I explained how heat works and why it is better than ice, for foot care for   healing of sore, painful, hurting feet and heels . 

    Here you some easy things  you can do at home to heat your feet so that that you can decrease  your soreness and pain.  Most of this material was taken from Chapter 9 my book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot.

     HEATING PADS, PARAFFIN BATHS AND SOAKS

    I have found that most people who have swelling of the feet and ankles, can  at home use heating pads, paraffin baths, or soaks. Regardless of which ones you use the aim is to decrease your pain by increasing blood flow to the damaged areas of your feet. This is the key to your healing. The trick is to use them on a daily bases, several times a day if you can. 

    Heating Pads

    Common sense demands that you do not to make the heating pad too hot. It you have any difficulties in feeling the proper temperature due to any type of problem(s), you may have to use your elbow to feel the warmth of the pad or get someone to check it for you.  Moreover, if you have, any doubts get the permission of your own physician before you start.  Diabetics are injured daily from heating pads. See the federal precautions below

    Paraffin Baths   see photo above

    One of my favorite home heat treatments is paraffin bath. It is one of the most effective methods of applying deep heat to relieve pain and stiffness. A paraffin bath is a plastic tub that you melt wax in. You dip your foot, into the tub of wax, applying several coats of wax up to the level of the ankle. Then you wrap your feet up in towels. The hot wax then sends great amounts of blood down to your feet. It is also great for painful hands. A good one costs about $150.00, but I saw one last year at Wal-Mart for about $50.00. With regular use, it can help remove the chronic pain, swelling, soreness, aching, and throbbing from your feet and ankles. As above, before using a paraffin bath make sure there is no medical reason why you can’t. 

    Soaks

    Since the time that man has been hanging out in caves, , we have been sticking our bodies in warm water to feel better. Be it a pan of water, a warm tub, or trip to your spa; soaking parts of our body has always been  a neat thing to do. From the standpoint of our feet, soaking will flush your feet by bring blood to it. As I said previous, this flushing will heal our feet, by washing away damaged tissues that have collected over a period. By getting this inflammation  out of the injured areas in your feet, you will start to feel better.

     DO NOT make the water very hot – warm is just fine. Do not waste any money by putting anything in the water; unless you want to. What is important that you soak it several times a day for about twenty minutes, if you can,  ASSUMING THERE IS NO CONTRINDICATIONS TO DO SO.

    I am so concerned with this that please find reprinted below the Food and Drugs Administration booklet on the proper use of heating devices.

    PLEASE READ BEFORE USING ANY HEATING DEVICE INCLUDING THE HEATING PAD OR PARRFINBATH.

    HEATING DEVICES

    HOW TO AVOID BURNS

    A PATIENT WITH ARTHRITIS SUFFERED A SECOND DEGREE BURN to the hip after receiving treatment with a heating pad for pain. Set at low, the heating pad was left on for less than 20 minutes with the patient lying on top of the pad. Later testing showed that the pad was working properly and met the manufacturer’s specifications. What went wrong? Therapeutic heating devices, such as heating pads, hot packs, and hot water bottles, although generally safe, can cause burns. Most burns result from improper use or use with inappropriate patients, such as infants and elderly patients. The severity of the burn is influenced by factors such as heat intensity, length of application, and the patient’s age, medical history, and ability to sense pain. What precautions can you take?

    Follow these do’s and don’ts to keep your patient safe when using heating devices:

    DO inspect the device before each use to ensure it’s in proper condition.

    DO read directions and contraindications for use.

    DO use a protective cover.

    DO place the pad or pack on top of not underneath the patient.

    DO assess skin integrity frequently and adjust the therapy interval according to the patient’s skin tolerance – no longer than 15 to 20 minutes.

    DON’T use the device on someone who’s sleeping or unconscious, an infant, or a patient with altered mental status or decreased skin sensation (such as people with diabetes or compromised skin circulation).

    DON’T use pins to fasten the device in place.

    DON’T use with ointments or salve preparations containing heat-producing ingredients.

    DON’T use electrical heating devices in an oxygen-enriched environment or near oxygen-emitting equipment.

    Most of the above is common sense but it was important that you read it.

    Over the years I have helped many patients by having them use  heat at home.  Give it a try, but just be  careful. 

     

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot Doctor, Panama City Fl

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot Doctor, Panama City Fl

    About the Author:  Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot doctor, foot specialist, podiatrist  of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center  and is a leading authority on the Morton’s Toe,  Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of   Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot the story of the Morton’s Toe  Dr. Schuler, graduated from the N. Y. College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care. During his thirty-seven year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and other publications. Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio and television programs both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management,  the National Board of Podiatric Examiners and the American Board of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis). 

    Sore Feet Best Treated by Heat not Ice says Podiatrist

     

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler-Podiatrist-sore-feet-expert-Panama City-fl

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Panama City Fl

     In my 2009 book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot I explain why  I love using heat for the treatment of chronically  sore feet  and heel problems. Some doctors may disagree with me, and say ice is better, but after being a podiatrist for  37 years and for treating  about 25,000 patients during that time, I absolutely believe that heat is the way to go for helping  sore, painful, aching feet . Ice is okay right after an injury, like when you twist your ankle. But besides that, heat is the best way to go, for you to mend your own damaged feet.

    Why Heat? The most oblivious reason is the wonderful soothing effect heat has. It will just make you feel better. This is for the simple reason that heat will increase the blood flowing into the foot . When more blood is brought into the foot, it will start to remove all of the damaged tissues that has buildup over a period of years. This buildup was due to the constant abuses that your feet were exposed to. Once you start to flush, or push out this stuff, the redness, swelling, soreness,  throbbing and aching in your feet and other parts of your body will start to go away.

    How It Works: The best way I can explain this is to tell you about the puddle verse the water hose. If you have a large puddle of water that was caused by a heavy rain in front of your house, you might want to get rid of it. So how do you do it? Well, you can take a bucket and with several trips get rid of it that way. Or you can take a broom and sweep it away. Or, you can take your hose and with using the sprayer push more water into puddle making it wash away. That is exactly what you are doing with soaks, heating pads, and paraffin bath (see below). You are washing away, and pushing out, the abnormal buildup of inflammation due to injuries, by adding more circulation to the area. Podiatrists have under stood this concept for years, and often will give a nerve block in the foot in order to increase the circulation. When certain nerves in the foot are numbed or blocked , it has the effect of causing the blood vessels to open up wider, and bring more down blood into the foot. This increase blood flow decreases pain and inflammation by washing away all of the rubbish that has buildup over time, in your foot. Basically this is the same concept as the hose and the puddle. And, that is what you will be doing when you use heat to bring more blood into your feet. Ice is doing the exact opposite by closing down the blood vessels and not letting blood in. People like ice because it is freezing and numbing  the area which I feel is the worst thing you can do. Again the aim of the treatment is to bring more blood into the area to wash away the   inflammation that is build up. 

    In my next article I will write about specific things you can do at home to heat your feet.

     

    more about fx ankles draft

    With the snow and ice fast approaching the number of patients heading to the emergency room with suspected ankle fractures is quickly rising! In previous Blogs we’ve talked about ankle fractures, but this week I want to talk about a different type of fracture associated with ankle injuries: the 5th metatarsal base fracture!

    The 5th metatarsal bone is a long bone in the foot that connects the rearfoot to the 5th toe. It is one of five metatarsal bones in the foot, each corresponding to a digit. Fractures of the 5th metatarsal base (the end of the bone closest to the ankle) are commonly associated with classic ankle injuries where the foot turns inward.

    There is a muscle that passes along the outside of the ankle and inserts into the 5th metatarsal bone at its base called the peroneus brevis (PB). With an ankle sprain or injury where the foot turns inward, the PB contracts and pulls on the 5th metatarsal base, sometimes so strong that it avulses, or pulls a piece of bone away from the rest of the metatarsal bone. Therefore, when you twist your ankle and have not suffered an ankle fracture, you may not be completely ‘home-free;’

    You should be suspicious of a 5th metatarsal base fracture any time that you are suspicious of an ankle injury. However, residual pain along the outside of the foot along the 5th metatarsal bone is a good indicator of injury to that area. Try sliding your finger along the outside border of your foot from your 5th toe back towards your heel.Along the way you should feel a “bump” which is the landmark of your 5th metatarsal base. Pain in that are can be indicative of a fracture, as that is the most likely place where the PB would have pulled off a piece of bone. Be particularly suspicious if the pain in that area has not improved several days after your ‘ankle twisting incident.’

    Fractures of the 5th metatarsal base are particularly tricky to treat because the blood supply to that area of the bone is delicate. In the area of such fractures, two blood supplies are coming together, and disruption of their connection via fracture can permanently hinder the healing process, as blood supply is imperative to bone healing.Keeping that in mind, early detection of a 5th metatarsal base fracture is important so that immobilization can be initiated as soon as possible. The goal of immobilization is to decrease motion at the site of the fracture to encourage healing making the delicate blood supply less of a factor!

    There are several ways in which immobilization of the fracture site can be initiated and the choice depends on the severity of the fracture. If the fracture is well aligned and shows no gapping between fragments, conservative treatment with immobilization in a short leg cast is indicated. If the fracture is displaced and there is significant gapping between the fragments, the fracture is unlikely to heel unless the fragments are brought back closer together. In this case, surgery may be indicated to place a pin or screw across the fracture site and immobilize the fragment with the “hardware.” A short leg case is still indicated to ensure that the patient remains non-weightbearing and minimizes the risk on non-healing.

    In either scenario, 4-6 weeks in a cast should be expected so that the bone has time to heal. Once healing is noted and pain in the area of the fracture is severely decreased or absent, transition into a walking cast and eventually back into a comfortable supportive sneaker can be allowed.

    Next time you twist your ankle, don’t be fooled into thinking is just an ankle injury, unless you’ve been cleared by your Podiatrist and no 5thmetatarsal base fracture has been suffered!

     


    Navicular Fractures

     

    Over the last year or so, we’ve covered many topics and have certainly hit on some of the more common pathologies in the world of Podiatric Medicine. Over the next month, I’m going to be blogging about some less common diagnosis and pathologies.

    To start us off into the world of rare pathologies, we will be covering navicular fractures this week. A navicular fracture is rare but can be seen, especially in athletes. First, lets talk about what and where the navicular bone is.

    The navicular is a bone in the foot also known as the scaphoid bone. It is located towards the inside of the foot (medially) between the heel and the metatarsals. It can be found by running your fingers along the inside of the foot starting at the heel and moving towards the toes. As you slide your fingers along your foot, the first small bump/bulge you feel indicates the location of the navicular. The bone extends from the medial side of the foot, half way across the top over to the outside (lateral side) of the foot. Picture a sideways teardrop-shaped piece of bone that serves as a stabilizer of the foot, particularly the arch.

    The best way to discuss navicular fractures is to break them down by the type of fracture suffered. Navicular fractures come in 4 types, as classified by the Watson and Jones Classification System (here we go again: we Podiatrists classifying and naming everything)! Each type of fracture results from a slightly different mechanism of injury and, thus are treated according to that mechanism.

    1. Avulsion fracture of the most medial side (fracture of the palpable bump along the inside of the foot). At this area of the bone a large tendon, known as the Posterior Tibial Tendon, responsible for supporting the arch of the foot, attaches. An avulsion injury occurs when increased tension is placed on the tendon while the foot is moving away from the body, whereby the strength of the tendon pulls off (avulses) the most prominent piece of the navicular bone. Most of these fracture fragments remain in close proximity to the main portion of the navicular and will heal properly with immediate immobilization via casting and non-weight bearing for at least 4 to 6 weeks.

    2. Chip fracture off of the top surface of the bone. This type of navicular fracture is the most common of the 4 types (although still a rare injury) and can also be referred to as an avulsion injury. Although this time it is not a tendon that is pulling off a piece of bone, but rather a ligament on the top of the foot that becomes tensioned while the foot is moving downward and inward at the same time. If the avulsed fragment is small, casting with non-weight bearing for 4 to 6 weeks is indicated, but if the fragment is much larger surgery may be required to accurately reposition the fragments.

    3. Fracture of the body. This type of navicular injury is the least common fracture type and typically results from direct injury, such as a can of soup tumbling out of the pantry and falling onto the foot! The fracture line usually extends from the top to the bottom of the foot, splitting the bone in half. If the two pieces remain close in proximity, casting with non-weight bearing for 4 to 6 weeks is adequate treatment. However, if the pieces become separated or if there are more than two pieces created with injury, surgery may be indicated to re-approximate the fragments and encourage a greater chance for healing.

    4. Stress fracture of the body of the navicular. This diagnosis is commonly overlooked because the injury is very difficult to evaluate on standard x-ray therefore, diagnosis comes with a high index of suspicion on the part of your Podiatrist. Sufferers of navicular stress fractures are commonly track and field athletes who describe vague and diffuse pain in the midfoot region. If not recognized and treated with immobilization immediately, a stress fracture can lead to complete fracture.

    Navicular fractures can be treated in a fairly straightforward fashion, by recognition and casting with non-weight bearing until healing has been achieved. Unless the fracture fragments are displaced (separated from one another), surgery can typically be avoided. Navicular fracture may not be the first injury to come to mind in foot and ankle injuries, as it is fairly uncommon, but it can be seen!

     
     
     

    Tailors Bunion Surgical Repair

     

    We just talked about what a tailors bunion is, including why it forms and how it can be treated conservatively. Just to refresh, a tailors bunion is much like the typical bunion except that it is located on the outside of the foot rather than the inside. The bone affected when a tailors bunion develops is the 5th metatarsal bone. There are a total of 5 metatarsal bones in the foot, each corresponding with a toe, such that the 5th metatarsal is located between the rearfoot and the 5th toe, along the outside of the foot.

    Aside from an inherited bowing of the 5th metatarsal outward, most tailors bunions are caused by splaying of the foot with gait. This means that with each step, the foot widens out and when the sides of the foot come in contact with the shoe, excess pressure develops and eventually pain. As a result of the excess pressure, responses from both the skin and bone underneath the pressure area induce the formation of thickened skin (callus) and reactive bone growth on the head of the 5th metatarsal, creating the characteristic baby “bump” that is your tailors bunion.

    There are a variety of conservative measures which we have already covered, so the aim this week is to briefly review a few of the more common surgical options, should all conservative methods fail.

    Soft Tissue Procedures: Although there are various soft tissue procedures that can be used to correct for the traditional bunion located on the inside of the foot, because there are fewer and small structures surrounding the 5th metatarsal, 5th toe and outside of the foot, soft tissue procedures are typically unsuccessful and rarely attempted.

    Bone Procedures: When addressing a tailors bunion there are two main options for which bowing of the metatarsal and reactive bone growth can be addressed. There is a “shave the bump” method and a “bone cut” method.

    -Shaving the bump: This procedure basically involves removing or shaving off the outside portion of the 5th metatarsal head to prevent it from pushing up against a shoe. The reactive bone growth in addition to a small amount of the normal bone would be removed and smoothed down decreasing the size of the bump. This type of procedure does not require any pins or screws for fixation and is typically used for mild deformities with great success.

    - Bone cuts: There are numerous procedures that can be performed where a bone cut would be made, but no matter which type of cut, all procedures aim to achieve the same result: decreasing the deformity and reducing pain/pressure. A bone cut allows the head of the bone (the portion closest to the toe) to be shifted over/inward that after healing reduces splaying of the foot with gait, decreasing pressure of the metatarsal bone against the shoe. This procedure does require a pin or screw that can be temporary or permanent depending on your Podiatrists preference, and is indicated for large tailors bunions.

    As with any surgical procedure the risks and benefits should be considered and discussed with your Podiatrist. Complications with any of the tailors bunion procedures described above can include infection, scarring, recurrence of deformity, and transfer pain among others, although the risks of any such complications are minimal. Patients should expect anywhere from 2-6 weeks of recovery depending on the procedure selected and they should expect pain typical of healing during the recovery period, in addition to lingering swelling. Again, all conservative options should be explored prior to surgical intervention, but should surgery be appropriate, pa

    What is a Corns, explained by Podiatrist, Foot Specialist

    painful-corn-office-dr- schuler-podiatrist-panama-city-fl.

    Painful Corn of the tip of the 3rd toe

     

    One of the most common question I always get asked is “ what is a corn “
    A corn is a thickening of the skin that occurs due to excess pressure and or friction on the top of a toe. As this abnormal process continues the toe will get irritated and a red area appears on the toe. As the irritation continues, more blood will come into the toe which increases the rate of the growth of the skin. This increase growth of the skin is abnormal At this point mother nature will attempt to put down a shock absorber over the toe to protect it. This is called corn.
     

    Besides swelling of the feet and toes, a complication of this irritation is that a bursitis which is a sac of fluid forms underneath the deepest part of the corn. This sac is also nature’s way of attempting to protect the underlying insulate bone and skin body tissues. As this inflamed bursa continues to become more irritated it will put pressure on a small sensory nerve branch. This will cause a dull, throbbing ache when it’s first starts, or a sharp exquisite pain at its worst. When this occurs shoe wearing becomes very difficult
    If the corn becomes chronic and the pressure continues to be exerted on it, not only will the underlying bone becomes inflamed but the body will respond by producing new body.

     

    hanner-toes-causes corns-courtsey-dr-schuler-podiatrist-panama-city-fl

    Hammer toes are common causes of corns

    A hammertoe, deformity is also a common cause of corns to occur due to a foot imbalance of the muscles

     

    small-corn-office-of-dr.-burton-schuler-podiatrist-panama-city-fl

    Start of a small corn 5th toe (see discoloration)

     

    Soft Corns

     A soft corn is usually found between 2 toes, normally the  fourth and fifth toes. It is formed from the friction of these two toes rubbing  against one another for a period of time. This abnormal friction makes mother nature produce a corn on one or both of the toes, The reason it is called soft is because of the moisture buildup in between the toes that makes it wet.  The treatment is the same as the corn on the top of the toes.

    soft-corn-of-4th-toe-office-dr.-burton-schuler-podiatrist-panama-city-fl

    This is a soft corn of the 4th toe

     Treatment

    Cutting or trimming of the top layer of a corn is the most common treatment Depending on the severity of the corn it will only give you temporary relief anywhere from 2 to 6 weeks
    For more involved corns, a minor office surgical procedure can be performed in your podiatrist’s office without any undue discomfort, either dur¬ing the procedure or afterwards. These minor incisions heal quickly, permitting the patient to return to normal foot gear almost at once, and without losing any time at work.

     

    New Plantar Fasciitist Video by National Known Podiatrist,

     Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot doctor, podiatrist of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center,  has produced  another new video for the public. This  one is about the painful heel condition know as  plantar fasciitist  He is also the author of the 2009  book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot which is the story of the Morton’s Toe and how it can cause pain thru out the whole body 

    This  video about this heel problem is just one in the ongoing videos Dr. Schuler plans  to presents to the public concerning the foot and all of it problems.  Schuler stated

    ” it is our aim to have eventfully one  of the largest video  library s available concerning the human foot”

    Below is Dr. Schuler new video about   plantar fasciitist  and how to treat it 

    Two Doctors write about Myofascial Trigger Points and Fibromyalgia

    President Kennedy & Dr. Janet Travell, White House 1961

    Dr. Janet Travell who felt that the Morton's Toe can be the cause of Myofacial Pain and Fibromyalgia, with President Kennedy in the Whites House April 1961

    Dr. Ginevra Liptan, author of the new book Figuring Out Fibromyalgia states that fascial inflammation is one part of a chain reaction that leads to other symptoms; that Fibromyalgia comes in (http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/04/prweb5272954.htm

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) like fibromyalgia (FMS), involves muscle pain throughout the body;  and they are linked in that they are different offshoots from the same epidemiologic source,.

    According to Dr. Burton S. Schuler, podiatrist of  Panama City, Florida, the intimate connections between MPS and FMS is from a condition known as the Morton’s Toe that he writes about in his bookWhy You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot. . In the book Schuler cites the pioneering pain research of Dr. Janet Travell, who served as White House physician for both Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, concerning the Morton’s Toe as the reason why MPS and FMS are related (http://www.footcare4u.com/category/dr-janet-travell/). 

    Dr. Schuler goes on to say that when  the foot is off, balance  which is the case with Morton’s Toe, the entire body can then  suffer with shooting pains, fatigue and burning sensations not only of the foot but according to Dr. Travell any muscle in the body.. These are all common symptoms reported by MPS and FMS patients   Schuler’s says may times this can be treated with a  simple toe pad, placed under casino real money the first toe and used to correct the foot’s imbalance from short first metatarsal bone This  has  help  many  (Not All) patients who also experience FMS and MPS related pain   

    In the 1920’s thru 50’s Dr. Dudley J. Morton who taught at Yale and Columbia Medical Schools, and  who was considered to be this country leading authority on the human foot stated  that a problem with one  bone  in your foot,  (Morton’s Toe)  was the major reason for most foot problems.  Building on his work Dr. Janet Travel, White House physician to Presidents John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson and who was also Professor Emeritus of Medicine at George Washington University wrote that Morton’s Toe could also cause pain all over your body. She taught that a Morton’s Toe could cause back, hip, knee, leg, and foot and ankles problems. and also cause fibromyalgia, arthritis, sleep disturbances, temporomandibular joint pain, and numerous other problems throughout the body.  The good news is that all of these problems caused by a Morton’s Toe can be easily treated by the average person.  

     

    New information about fibromyalgia

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     This is an article about Fibromyalgia written by Dr. Burton S. Schuler, foot care specialist , podiatrist , foot doctor of Panama City Florida reviewing new published information about fibromyalgia Just last year the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) proposed new, easier to apply diagnostic criteria for FMS that take into account common symptoms such as fatigue, sleep disturbances, and cognitive problems, as well as pain” (http://updates.pain-topics.org/2011/04/overcoming-barriers-to-managing.html). Since diagnostic criteria are constantly in flux, patients, who continue to experience pain, are left to their own devices in many circumstances. Thus, they may be more likely to turn to medical remedies that are “off the beaten path,” according to the article. In a recent article, “Overcoming Barriers to Managing Fibromyalgia” the author summarizes some of the challenges that newly diagnosed people experience (http://updates.pain-topics.org/2011/04/overcoming-barriers-to-managing.html). As it turns out, one of the biggest let downs for patients seeking relief from Fibromyalgia, a condition that has them experiencing chronic pain throughout their bodies, is that modern medicine does not provide them with quick relief. The condition is definitely a medical conundrum, leaving some health practitioners to see it more as a mental or behavioral issue that a physical issue as such. One unconventional medical issue to consider if you have Fibromyalgia is whether or not you have a short first metatarsal bone: also known as “Morton’s Toe.” According to Panama City, Florida podiatrist, Dr. Burton S. Schuler http://www.footcare4u.com/category/about-dr-schuler/ , who has treated patient for decades in his Northern Florida podiatry practice, there is a possible link between Morton’s Toe and Fibromyalgia since improper foot alignment can be a major medical issue—leading to many long term health problems. While the cause of Fibromyalgia is not known—and some medical experts believe the diagnosis is simply a cluster of symptoms—Schuler has successfully treated Fibromyalgia sufferers with a short metatarsal bone with a simple toe pad under the big toe . But he warns the pad is not a miracle pain cure and should be used cautiously and with medical oversight. The toe pad works to correct the foot’s overpronation, as it makes contact with the ground According to Schuler, pronation is one of the most important terms related to how the foot operates: “Pronation allows the shock of our body weight to be absorbed when the foot meets the ground. Pronation also makes it possible for the foot to adapt to all of the different surfaces we walk on.” Consideration that overpronation of your feet, caused by a short first metatarsal bone, can be linked to muscle pain elsewhere in your body may be good news for those who suffer from the stigma related to fibromyalgi 3YPA9NW7FP7F

    New Infor About Diabetes Writes Podiatrist

    In a new blog aimed at the millions of  diabetics a  podiatrist of Panama City, Fl cites new important data from the national known organization The Institute for Alternative Futures.  Dr. Burton S. Schuler says:

     In the United States’ Diabetes Crisis: Today and Future Trends, the institute states several important trends that are important in the future regarding far-reaching public health consequences.  According to the report, the CDC in Atlanta reports that approximately 26 plus million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes; and around 80 million more people have “pre diabetes” symptoms. This is approximately 28% of the U.S. population   In article also says in the past 5 years the cost of pre diabetes and diabetes was estimated at $218 billion and will rise.  As more patients experience disease progression and require clinical care, the health care system, and all kinds of health care providers, will feel the impact of this public health crisis     http://www.altfutures.org/diabetes2025/ 

    Dr. Schuler says theses professionals who interact with diabetic and prediabetic people have an important role to play in helping patients’ needs. He says many of these diabetic patients m have foot problems that can be treated easily by finding out if they have “Morton’s Toe”– short first metatarsal bone. He has been a professional member of the American Diabetsis Association for over 30 years 

    A short first toe can intensify complications for diabetics because the foot’s weight is unevenly distributed since the first toe does not do the work it should be doing.  You can imagine that if you already have a condition like Morton’s Toe—that can lead to bunions, hammer toes, plantar fasciitis, and other foot problems—then you are setting yourself up for complications if it remains untreated   Dr.  Schuler prescribes a simple toe pad that can be placed under the first toe to redistribute proper balance in the foot.

    While diabetes may not be as simple to treat, correcting other foot problems can go a long way to ensure that bad feet can’t be misdiagnosed as diabetic neuropathy–burning pain and numbness in the feet   www.footcare4u.com/category/diabetic-foot-care/.  Such a misdiagnosis can lead you down a path of more doctors and specialists—such as neurologists—when a trip to the podiatrist’s office and a diagnosis of Morton’s Toe can alleviate pain.  Again this is important news to consider as we figure out ways to militate against the growing diabetes epidemic and all of its accompanying medical complications.

    Foot Specialist explains what are Bunions and how to treat

    What are Bunions? 

    A simple bunion is an abnormal bump of bone that is formed at the head of our old friend, the first metatarsal bone. The bunion can either be on the top or side of the first metatarsal bone. In a more advanced bunion deformity, called Hallux Abducto Valgus, there starts to be a movement of the big toe toward the second toe. The most severe bunion is when the first toe not only moves toward the second toe, but it overlaps or underlaps the second toe. Bunions can cause swelling of the feet to occur.

    Mild bunions are abnormal “bumps of bone” formed on the side of the big toe joint or on the top of the big toejoint. Normal  foot  moderate Bunion drawing

    If untreated, a bunion can ultimately lead to a more serious arthritic condition of the joint or to a serious dislocation of the great toe causing overlapping or underlapping of the big toe onto the 2nd toe. This problem has the medical name of Hallux Abduto Valgus. Even a mild bunion can make you walk improperly, which in turn can lead to pains of your arch, leg and or back.
    severe  Bunion drawingAfter treating patients for over a third of a century I feel the number one reason for a person to have bunions is due to a Morton’s Toe caused by Inheritance.  (see Video below) We inherit our feet from our parents the same way we inherit many other traits. If mom or dad had a foot that was prone to forming bunions, you will have the tendency to acquire the same type of foot. It is not usual to see three generations of a family with the same type of bunion problems. To a much lesser extent poor posture and ill-fitting shoes may also be responsible for the formation of a bunion.

    Another type of bunion which some patients experience is what is known as a TAILOR’S BUNION or Bunionette. It is located on the opposite side of the foot where bunions normally appear, around the little toe joint, and emerges as something of a smaller bump, then the regular bunion.
    Drawing of Taylors BunionIn its early stages, the measures for relieving bunion pain at home are relatively uncomplicated. Warm water foot soaks may bring considerable, although transitory relief, as does cutting shoes out over the bunion.
    If conservative measures do not relieve the pain and deformity, it may be time to refer your bunion problem to your podiatrist. Please do not assume foot surgery is automatically needed to treat bunion problems. In fact foot surgery for bunions should always be a last resort. There are many ways to treat them without surgery.
    Such treatments as Physical TherapyOrthotics, padding and strapping (to treat the Morton’s Toe), and medications have proven to be some of the highly successful non-surgical treatments used in the Ambulatory Foot Clinic to treat bunions.

     

    Podiatrist Cites Mayo Clinic on Heel Spur Syndrome

     A podiatrist of Panama City Fl” states that the Mayo Clinic is correct in stating that “…the stretching of the plantar fascia is usually the major cause of heel spur syndrome. Dr. Burton S. Schuler goes on to say that   the Mayo Clinic website was also right when it says that a bone spurs that develop along the edges of bones, can cause rubbing against nearby nerves and bones, causing pain. A bone spur can cause no symptoms by themselves, and may go undetected for years. What treatment, if any, that you receive for your bone spurs depends on where they’re located and how they affect your health http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bone-spurs/DS00627

    Dr. Dudley J. Morton, one of the leading researchers on feet in the twentieth century, warned about how a short first metatarsal bone (“Morton’s Toe”) (Long Second Toe) can cause over-pronation of the foot which that then could cause heel spurs. Dr. Schuler explains: “If you have a Morton’s Toe the front part of the foot is unstable when it needs to be stable. Because of this, the foot will be forced to pronate. A pronating foot places abnormal stress on many areas of the foot, including the plantar fascia and the heel bone. It is this abnormal stress that is the start of all the heel problems noted above.  

    If a longer second toe is causing your painful heel problems, do not despair. The toe-pad that Schuler prescribes for Morton’s Toe (placed under the first toe of an over-pronating foot) can help heal those painful heels

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot doctor, foot specialist, podiatrist of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center and is a leading authority on the Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of the newly published book about The Morton’s Toe, Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot. The book is published by the La Luz Press, Inc and is disturbed national by the Cardinal Publishing Group.  Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in The Foot, is the story of how one bone in your foot could be the real reason for pains thru out your whole body. It is important because it offer the public new information about why millions of people suffer everyday with aches and pains, and offers new hope to get rid of problems they believed they would have to live with forever. It literally can be the “medical missing link” KGJXEMYYNCKN

    Podiatrist Cites New Information About Diabetes

    8WB3EFSE2VTB

    In a new article Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot doctor, foot care specialist (Podiatrist) of Panama City, Fl cites new important data from the national known organization The Institute for Alternative Futures

     In the United States’ Diabetes Crisis: Today and Future Trends, the institute states several important trends that are important in the future regarding far-reaching public health consequences.  According to the report, the CDC in Atlanta reports that approximately 26 plus million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes; and around 80 million more people have “pre diabetes” symptoms. This is approximately 28% of the U.S. population   In article also says in the past 5 years the cost of pre diabetes and diabetes was estimated at $218 billion and will rise.  As more patients experience disease progression and require clinical care, the health care system, and all kinds of health care providers, will feel the impact of this public health crisis     http://www.altfutures.org/diabetes2025/ 

    Dr. Schuler says theses professionals who interact with diabetic and prediabetic people have an important role to play in helping patients’ needs. He says many of these diabetic patients m have foot problems that can be treated easily by finding out if they have “Morton’s Toe”– short first metatarsal bone. He has been a professional member of the American Diabetsis Association for over 30 years 

    A short first toe can intensify complications for diabetics because the foot’s weight is unevenly distributed since the first toe does not do the work it should be doing.  You can imagine that if you already have a condition like Morton’s Toe—that can lead to bunions, hammer toes, plantar fasciitis, and other foot problems—then you are setting yourself up for complications if it remains untreated   Dr.  Schuler prescribes a simple toe pad that can be placed under the first toe to redistribute proper balance in the foot.

    While diabetes may not be as simple to treat, correcting other foot problems can go a long way to ensure that bad feet can’t be misdiagnosed as diabetic neuropathy–burning pain and numbness in the feet   www.footcare4u.com/category/diabetic-foot-care/.  Such a misdiagnosis can lead you down a path of more doctors and specialists—such as neurologists—when a trip to the podiatrist’s office and a diagnosis of Morton’s Toe can alleviate pain.  Again this is important news to consider as we figure out ways to militate against the growing diabetes epidemic and all of its accompanying medical complications.

    New Trends in Diabetsis reported by Panama City Podiatrist

    In a recent study reported by Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot specialist , podiatrist , foot doctor of Panama City, Fl ;  from The Institute for Alternative Futures entitled United States’ Diabetes Crisis: Today and Future Trends,   several far-reaching public health consequences were stated. In it The Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia reports that approximately 28 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes; and almost 80 million more people have “pre diabetes” symptoms.  In 2007, the cost of pre diabetes and diabetes was estimated at about $220 billion and will continue to go up yearly.  This will   cause greater demands upon all types of medical doctors, nutritionists, educators, nurses, and other professionals who interact with diabetic and prediabetic.    Dr.  Schuler who has treated thousands diabetes patients’ over three decades, in private practice  feels that many of these patients  can  avoid the foot problems associated with  Diabetsis  but finding out  if they have  a common foot  deformity known as the “Morton’s Toe”– short first metatarsal bone.

    A short first toe can intensify complications for diabetics because the foot’s weight is unevenly distributed since the first toe does not do the work it should be doing.  You can imagine that if you already have a condition like Morton’s Toe—that can lead to bunions, hammer toes, plantar fasciitis, and other foot problems—then you are setting yourself up for complications if it remains untreated).  . He also shows how to find out,   on his www.FootCare4U.com website  if you have a Morton’s Toe or not. Then if you do have a Morton’s Toe   Schuler then shows  how to make a simple toe pad that can be placed under the first toe to properly  redistribute  the weight on the foot

    While diabetes may not be as simple to treat, correcting other foot problems can go a long way to ensure that bad feet can’t be misdiagnosed as diabetic neuropathy–burning pain and numbness in the feet   Such a misdiagnosis can lead you down a path of more doctors and specialists—such as neurologists—when a trip to the podiatrist’s office and a diagnosis of Morton’s Toe can alleviate pain.  This is news to consider as we figure out ways to militate against the growing diabetes epidemic and all of its accompanying medical complications.

      Dr.  Burton Schuler, podiatrist of Panama City Fl graduated from the N. Y. College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care. During his thirty-five year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and other publications. and is a leading authority on the Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of the newly published book about The Morton’s Toe, Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In the Foot. The book is published by the La Luz Press, Inc and is disturbed national by the Cardinal Publishing Group.  Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot, is the story of how one bone in your foot could be the real reason for pains thru out your whole body Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio and television programs both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management, and the National Board of Podiatric Examiners. Dr. Schuler is certified as a wound specialist from the American Board of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis).  PAR8N4ZKHHRM 

    Simple Treatment for Painful Corns, Calluses, and Bunions

     Painful Corns,  Calluses, and Bunions are very common foot ailments .  In his 2009 book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot,Dr. Burton Schuler podiatrist of Panama City, Fl

    Xray of a Morton's Toe

    Xray of a Morton's Toe, note short 1st metatarsal bone as compared to 2nd

    contends that having a second toe that is longer than the first one (Morton’s Toe) can lead to a range of painful conditions from the more common calluses, bunions and corns, to march fractures, night cramps (Restless Leg Syndrome), and even fibromyaglia and temporo-mandubular joint pain (TMJ). How can a seemingly innocuous occurrence like a longer second toe potentially cause other painful ailments? According to Dr. Schuler, the answer can be found in two simple words: abnormal pronation

    Pronation occurs every time the foot hits the ground. Normal pronation occurs when the foot naturally adjusts to and absorbs the shock of a new walking surface. The arch starts to “pronate” (or flatten out) once it has hit the surface. During normal pronation, this flattening out eventually stops. A longer second toe will hit the ground before the first toe, and this can cause abnormal pronation, which means that the foot continues to roll inward when it hits the ground. The first toe can not do the normal job of supporting most of the foot’s weight, and extra stress is placed on the second toe. This extra stress can cause a variety of painful conditions, many of which are described on the website www.whyyoureallyhurt.com.

    Some of the most common of these foot conditions are calluses, bunions, and corns. While many people assume that changing shoes will diminish the development of these common foot ailments, different shoes alone may not necessarily do the trick when you have a long second toe. Not matter what type of shoes you wear, if your foot endures abnormal pronation you may develop corns, bunions, or calluses to compensate for the stress on the foot. (The most common location for calluses is under the second metatarsal bone, where much stress is placed in the case of Morton’s Toe.

    Not only is this good news for people who continue to switch shoes with little luck, but it is also good news for your pocketbook. On his website www.FootCare4U.com, Schuler suggests that in many cases a simple $2 toe pad under the first toe can reduce the development of calluses, bunions and corns. He details how to make your own pad in his book and on his website/. So you can skip the trip to the shoe store, and head to your computer or the book store instead for fast foot relief!

    Normally, when we consider the size and shape of our toes, we do not readily link this to other physical conditions. But according to Dr. Burton S. Schuler, a Panama City, Florida foot doctor, podiatrist who has practiced for over 36 years, the size of our toes really matters when it comes to diagnosing and treating painful medical conditions. Dr. Schuler is a leading expert on the medical consequences of Morton’s Toe—or long second toe. This condition is named after one of the most famous doctors in the first half of the century, Dr. Dudley J. Morton, who was the first to write a research paper identifying this problem.

    Dr. Schuler, graduated from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care During his thirty-five year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and other publications. Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio and television programs both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management, and the National Board of Podiatric Examiners. Dr. Schuler is certified as a wound specialist from the American Academy of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis  6BQZ2FF4AWG3

    Foot Care, Podiatrist writes about Fibromyalgia Awareness

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot doctor, Panama City  Fl

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot doctor, Panama City Fl

    Back in May 2011 Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot specialist , podiatrist, of 2401 W. 15th Street, Panama City, Fl wrote about National Fibromyalgia Awareness Day that was published on Expert Click. Com that went around the world

    May 12, 2011 is National Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, according to the National Fibromyalgia Association, an organization that started the day in order to educate the public about the condition. The NFA has an “Annual Fibromyalgia Awareness Day Proclamation Program”, an international program established in 1999 to promote fibromyalgia awareness. According to the website: “Local groups have used the NFA’s Awareness Day press releases to garner media coverage of local events and raise awareness of FM and local support group activities. Each year a new theme is designated for the annual awareness campaign creating messages of hope and understanding” (http://www.fmaware.org).

     The Merck Manual describes Fibromyalgia as “a common nonarticular disorder of unknown cause characterized by generalized aching (sometimes severe), widespread tenderness of muscles, areas around tendon insertions, and adjacent soft tissues, as well as muscle stiffness, fatigue and poor sleep” (http://www.unboundmedicine.com/merckmanual/ub/view/Merck-Manual-Pro/503224/all/Fibromyalgia?q=Polymyalgia%20Rheumatica). 

    This year’s Awareness Day theme is “Walk to Cure FM,” which seeks to log 5408 miles by May 12th.  Since walking is this year’s theme, the research of Panama City podiatrist, Burton S. Schuler, is especially pertinent to Fibromyalgia education.  Schuler has practiced podiatry for over 30 years in Northern Florida, and has innovative observations about the relationship between Fibromyalgia and a common foot condition available in his book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot and his websites http://www.footare4u.com. As anyone suffering from Fibromyalgia knows, causes and treatments are highly controversial.  Schuler writes that he has had many Fibromyalgia patients who also have a condition called “Morton’s Toe,” which is a short first metatarsal toe that results in uneven distribution of weight throughout the foot. 

    This uneven distribution of weight can cause pain throughout the body—which is how Schuler links Fibromyalgia pain to Morton’s Toe.  Schuler suggests a simple toe pad placed under the first toe to distribute weight evenly is a possible Morton’s Toe treatment, depending on the individual.   Schuler advises: “The Toe Pad is very dynamic and in fact can make someone with fibromyalgia worse.  So the best thing to do is to try the Toe Pad only for about one or two hours a day for a week. If that feels good, then gradually add one hour every week, until your body gets use to the Toe Pad” 

     This year’s National Fibromyalgia Awareness Day “Walking” theme is fitting for podiatrists like Schuler whose writings are attempting to educate people on potential links between foot health and chronic bodily pain. GVNZBVXUCAQZ

    Foot care specialist, Podiatrist writes Barefoot Running

     Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot specialist, podiatrist, foot doctor, Panama City

    Office of Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot specialist, podiatrist, foot doctor, Panama City Fl

     Dr. Burton S. Schuler podiatrist, foot care specilaist of 2401 W. 15th Street Panama City, Fl  wrote this article about bare foot running that was pickedup by hundreds of  news outlets 

    Dr. Neil Blitz of California writes that barefoot running is not for everyone.  Those with flat feet, bunions, hammer toes, diabetes, and metatarsalgia may want to avoid barefoot running due to their feet’s in-built lack of support.  In  at Huffington Post article Blitz, also announced that May 1st   , 2011  was the first annual International Barefoot Running Day.  Barefoot running has become more of a common trend, as dedicated runners seek relief from sports related injuries that more people increasingly link to poor footwear.  (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neal-m-blitz/should-you-be-running-bar_b_853093.html). Blitz summarizes the appeal of barefoot running: “Running barefoot is not just about running without sneakers, it’s about re-training your body how to run. The main difference between the two styles of running center around foot strike — the moment your foot makes contact with the ground.  When running in sneakers, your heel makes contact with the ground first (heel strike) then as your body passes over the foot, pressure rolls onto the arch then pushes off with the ball of the foot” 

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, a Panama City Fl podiatrist, http://www.footcare4u.com/category/about-dr-schuler/   links the above foot conditions to a short first metatarsal bone—in many cases.  In his book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot, Schuler warns that even if you have a normal foot structure,  running too much will eventually cause you problems  . 

      But you will experience worse problems if you suffer from a common condition known as Morton’s Toe—or a short first metatarsal bone.  Schuler writes about runners with Morton’s Toe: “Our bodies were not designed to take the abuse that can be caused by a Morton’s Toe when you are a runner or jogger. If you think you may have some foot problem, don’t wait to start using the Toe Pad or Shoe Insert   written about in  Schuler  book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot.”  Schuler asserts that runners can avoid shin splints, Anterior Compartment Syndrome, Overuse Syndrome, Chondromalacia (Runner’s Knee) and other problems caused by the constant abuse and pounding on the body brought on by running.   

    Blitz also acknowledges the new minimal footwear many runners are wearing to mimic running barefoot without the fear of stepping on sharp objects: “The main concern is stepping on a sharp object leading to puncture injury, and a specific area of caution from the medical community. This should not be taken lightly as foot puncture is a real risk and may lead to serious problems. I have treated severe limb-threatening infections from simple pedal scrapes. Make sure your tetanus is up to date!” (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neal-m-blitz/should-you-be-running-bar_b_853093.html).  He concurs with Schuler that there are many complications to consider when running on normal feet already can cause problems over time, and runners should exercise caution when attempting to change shoe wear. 

    For those who have found barefoot running to be the answer, then happy First International Barefoot Running day! 

     

    Treating Calluses, Bunions, and Corns

     

    Why You Really Hurt

     Normally, when we consider the size and shape of our toes, we do not readily link this to other physical conditions. But according to Dr. Burton S. Schuler, a Panama City, Florida foot doctor, podiatrist who has practiced for over 36 years, the size of our toes really matters when it comes to diagnosing and treating painful medical conditions. Dr. Schuler is a leading expert on the medical consequences of Morton’s Toe—or long second toe. This condition is named after one of the most famous doctors in the first half of the century, Dr. Dudley J. Morton, who was the first to write a research paper identifying this problem.

    In his 2009 book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot, Dr. Schuler follows in Dr. Dudley Morton’s footsteps. Schuler contends that having a second toe that is longer than the first one (Morton’s Toe) can lead to a range of painful conditions from the more common calluses, bunions and corns, to march fractures, night cramps (Restless Leg Syndrome), and even fibromyaglia and temporo-mandubular joint pain (TMJ). How can a seemingly innocuous occurrence like a longer second toe potentially cause other painful ailments? According to Dr. Schuler, the answer can be found in two simple words: abnormal pronation

    Pronation occurs every time the foot hits the ground. Normal pronation occurs when the foot naturally adjusts to and absorbs the shock of a new walking surface. The arch starts to “pronate” (or flatten out) once it has hit the surface. During normal pronation, this flattening out eventually stops. A longer second toe will hit the ground before the first toe, and this can cause abnormal pronation, which means that the foot continues to roll inward when it hits the ground. The first toe can not do the normal job of supporting most of the foot’s weight, and extra stress is placed on the second toe. This extra stress can cause a variety of painful conditions, many of which are described on the website www.whyyoureallyhurt.com.

    Some of the most common of these foot conditions are calluses, bunions, and corns. While many people assume that changing shoes will diminish the development of these common foot ailments, different shoes alone may not necessarily do the trick when you have a long second toe. Not matter what type of shoes you wear, if your foot endures abnormal pronation you may develop corns, bunions, or calluses to compensate for the stress on the foot. (The most common location for calluses is under the second metatarsal bone, where much stress is placed in the case of Morton’s Toe.

    Not only is this good news for people who continue to switch shoes with little luck, but it is also good news for your pocketbook. On his website www.FootCare4U.com, Schuler suggests that in many cases a simple $2 toe pad under the first toe can reduce the development of calluses, bunions and corns. He details how to make your own pad in his book and on his website/. So you can skip the trip to the shoe store, and head to your computer or the book store instead for fast foot relief!

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler foot doctor, foot specialist, podiatrist of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center and is a leading authority on the Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of the newly published book about The Morton’s Toe, Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In the Foot. The book is published by the La Luz Press, Inc and is disturbed national by the Cardinal Publishing Group. Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot, is the story of how one bone in your foot could be the real reason for pains thru out your whole body. It is important because it offer the public new information about why millions of people suffer everyday with aches and pains, and offers new hope to get rid of problems they believed they would have to live with forever. It literally can be the “medical missing link”

    Dr. Schuler, graduated from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care During his thirty-five year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and other publications. Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio and television programs both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management, and the National Board of Podiatric Examiners. Dr. Schuler is certified as a wound specialist from the American Academy of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis)  .6BQZ2FF4AWG3  tec April 8, 2012



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    Is Barefoot Running Changing the World asks Podiatrist

     

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot Doctor,  Panama City Fl

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Podiatrist, Foot Doctor, Panama City Fl

    Barefoot running enthusiasts gearing up for May 1, 2011, which was the inaugural International Barefoot Running Day, with the motto: “Changing the Running World One Odd Look at a Time” (http://www.barefootrunners.org/ibrd).  Barefoot running has really taken off, and this day is dedicated to advancing the mission of barefoot running enthusiasts.  The Barefoot Runners Society is one such group, and their mission is summarized on their website (http://www.barefootrunners.org):

     To offer resources that unites barefoot and minimalist runners from around the world.

     

    While there are many barefoot and minimal running enthusiasts (with minimal running being commonly associated with foot wear that mimics barefoot running such as the Vibram Five Fingers shoe), not all medical and health practitioners are in agreement about barefoot running.  And some conduct research that suggests other physical conditions besides shoe wear can be causing running problems (http://whyyoureallyhurt.com/mortons-toe/jogging-and-running/). 

     For barefoot runners, shoe weight is usually described as the biggest impediment to running.  All running shoes have weight—“the enemy of running performance, because it increases the oxygen cost of running at any given pace”. The Barefoot Runners Society cites a new Universityof Nebraskastudy that demonstrates this is indeed the case: “Ten recreational runners were asked to run with and without shoes on a treadmill and overground (on an indoor track) while breathing into a mask connected to a machine that measured oxygen consumption. The researchers found that oxygen consumption was significantly greater at a fixed running pace both on the treadmill (2%) and overground (5.7%). Ratings of perceived effort were also significantly higher with shoes on. This is important, because how hard running feels is the ultimate determinant of how well runners perform. These findings therefore suggest that runners could record faster race times barefoot than shod” (http://barefootrunners.org/story/sports-science-update-barefoot-running-more-efficient-matt-fitzgerald-competitor-group). 

     Many podiatrists who have researched common foot ailments warn that although being free of the extra weight from your running shoes may allow your form to improve, and your oxygen consumption to decrease, thus diminishing overall effort, barefoot running is not for everyone.  In Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot, Panama City, Florida podiatrist, Dr, Burton S. Schuler explains that not all feet are built the same: some people, whether they know it or not, suffer from common abnormal foot problems that can significantly challenge your running performance—with or without shoes one.  One condition Schuler devotes much attention to is known as “Morton’s Toe,” or short first metatarsal toe. This condition can cause improper shock absorption and overpronation in the feet, leading to pain throughout the body.  It is also linked to common conditions such as bunions, hammer toes, fibromyalgia, night cramps, heel spurs and plantar fasciitis   One common treatment is a toe pad, which helps redistribute the proper weight throughout your foot as it hits the ground  vv

    So if you are considering trying barefoot or minimal running, you may want to see whether you have Morton’s Toe first and take the proper precautions to avoid future foot problems.


    Dr. Burton Schuler Podiatrist asks what’s new in running ?

     

                                                    Dr. Roger Bainster Breaking the 4 Minute Mile

                                                   Dr. Roger Bainster breaking the 4 minute mile

     A new book by author Christopher McDougall, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen summarizes the foundational concepts of barefoot running.  He explains that while people have focused much attention on shoe wear, it is really an issue with form.  He also argues that running free of cumbersome shoe wear is essential to human nature (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/04/22/2180569/author-mcdougall-challenges-us.html).  Citing anthropological evidence for his support of barefoot and minimalist running, he draws extensively from the Tarahumara tribe: they live in the Copper Canyons of Mexico and run great distances without injuries because, he claims, they wear homemade sandals to run in.  Since the publication of McDougall’s book, they have figured prominently in conversations about the barefoot movement, which deems the thickly padded shoes detrimental to feet everywhere (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/04/22/2180569/author-mcdougall-challenges-us.html#ixzz1KZZd4W00). 

    As the first annual International Barefoot Runners Day approaches on May 1, 2011, the concept of barefoot running will be getting more attention. There must be something to it since so many people have testified that running barefoot or with lighter shoes—such as the Vibram Five Fingers shoe– has helped them overcome repetitive injuries or generalized pain from their athletic pursuits.  Dr. Burton S. Schuler,   author of Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts in the Foot, has practice podiatry in Panama City, Florida for over three decades and has treated world class runners and athletes.  Schuler has written on the importance of customizing your footwear and exercise routines to fit your own unique situation  This can include having your feet checked to see if you suffer from a short first metatarsal bone.  If you do, this condition is known as “Morton’s Toe” and can greatly impact your running form.  Schuler prescribes a toe pad to patients who need something to help correct the foot’s natural alignment when it hits the ground (http://whyyoureallyhurt.com/home/#tp).

     While McDougall supports the idea of moving away from thickly padded running shoes, he also acknowledges that different shoes work for different people, or the same runner may want to consider where they are running, their own form, etc.  Schuler’s advice that a short first metatarsal bone can impact running form, when combined with the latest attention paid to barefoot and minimal shoe wear, gives runners and other athletes opportunities to expand their own comfort zones, eliminate pain, and enhance their enjoyment of their sport.  Whether you believe, as McDougall does, that running is essential to human nature, and that we were all “born to run”, today runners have more research and information at their fingertips than ever before—including McDougall’s views

    Podiatrist tells how the Morton’s Toe causes Knee Pain

    Morton’s Toe| Expert explains what is it, and what causes it

    A Morton's Toe, note long 2nd toe

     “Morton’s Toe”, or Long Second Toe means  having either one or both of two abnormal, inherited conditions of the first metatarsal bone of the foot (see next paragraphy) . Morton’s Toe was first written about in the 1920s by Dr. Dudley J. Morton. Its importance in causing pain throughout the body was taught by Dr. Janet Travell who was President Kennedy’s and Johnson’s White House physician.

    What is the first metatarsal bone ?

    The first metatarsal bone is a finger-like bone to which the big toe attaches to. It extents about halfway down your foot toward your heel. There are five metatarsal bones one that attaches to each toe bone. They are inside your foot so you really cannot see them. The only way to truly see the metatarsal bones is with an x-ray of the foot.

    Morton’s Toe,  Long Second Toe , can be caused by one or both of two problems that can effect the first metatarsal bone.

    1. The first abnormal condition, and the most noted one, that can cause Morton’s Toe is where your first metatarsal bone is shorter than your second metatarsal bone.

    2. The second condition that can cause a Morton’s Toe is when your first metatarsal bone is not as stable as it should be, and as a result, has too much motion. This is known as “Hypermobility of the First Metatarsal Bone.”

    Do You Have a Short First Metatarsal Bone

     Look down at your feet. Socks off please! The Long Second Toe, or Short First metatarsal bone:

     If your second toe seems longer, (and I mean even just a hair longer) than your first toe, you may have a short first metatarsal bone. The above photograph show a classic Morton’s Toe , Long Second Toe caused by a short first metatarsal bone. Note how the big toe is shorter than the second toe. Morton’s Toe is normally not this noticeable. Most of the time in a Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe the big toe will appear to be only a little shorter than the second toe or just about the same length as the second toe.

    Another way to check to see if you have a short first metatarsal bone is to hold your first and second toes down. Right behind the spot where the toes attach to the foot, you will see bumps pushing up from the top of your foot. These bumps are the heads of the first and second metatarsal bones. Using a pen, lipstick, or marker, draw a line where the bumps end (flat area) and meet the top of the foot. This spot is the very end of both of the heads of the first and second metatarsal bones. Look at both lines. If the line of the second metatarsal head is farther down your foot toward your toes than the first metatarsal head, even just a very little, then you probably have a short first metatarsal bone. Sometimes it is not necessary to draw a line on top of the foot because the relationship of the metatarsal heads can easily be seen. If this is the case, you can see without difficulty that the second metatarsal head is farther down the top of the foot than the first metatarsal head.

     

                                               

    A “webbed” 2nd and 3rd toe, as seen with a Morton’s Toe,

    Frequently, people with short first metatarsal bones will also have a “webbing” between their second and third toes like the picture above. They will have a flap of excess skin that sort of looks like a “bat wing” in between the second and third toes. If you do have this webbing of the toes, it is a pretty good tip off that you do have a short metatarsal bone or you are part duck. Check to see if Mom or Dad, or anyone else in the family has this also.

    Do You Have Hypermobility of the First Metatarsal Bone:

    In a 1928 paper in the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, and in Chapter 23 of his book The Human Foot, Dr. Dudley J. Morton father of the Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe, writes about, hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone, the other problems associated with Morton’s Toe. Hypermobility of the First Metatarsal Bone may not be as famous as its “partner in pain,” the short first metatarsal bone, but in Morton’s own words “is responsible for the widest range of foot problems”. Hypermobility refers to the excessive motion present at the first metatarsal bone. In the normal foot, there would be very little motion at this area. But in a foot with hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone, there is an excessive amount of motion that takes place.

    According to Dr. Morton, the reason for the excessive motion is due to an abnormal laxity (looseness) of the plantar ligament that runs under the metatarsal bone. This laxity is either inherited or acquired in childhood. Because the ligament is abnormally loose, the first metatarsal bone is not as stable as it should be, resulting in many foot problems. Unlike the short first metatarsal bone, Long Second Toe, there is no simple reliable way that you can determine on your own if you have hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone. But because it is treated the same way as the short first metatarsal bone, with the Toe Pad, discussed in greater detail in the new book Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot

    It is not that important for you to know for sure if you have hypermobility or not.

    What counts is are you any feeling better once you start to treat yourself for your Morton’s Toe? Dr. Morton recognized that besides having either a short first metatarsal bone, Long Second Toe, or hypermobility of that bone, there were many other actions, stresses, strains, and forces that affected the way your foot works and that can cause and contribute to foot problems. At no time or place did Dr. Morton ever state that having either of those conditions was a guarantee of having a foot problem or any other problem. In fact, the only thing he ever stated was that by having the short first metatarsal bone or the hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone may lead to having foot problems. In addition, it is very important that you need to be aware of  the  Aches and Pains a Morton’s Toe can cause, of your feet and body. Morton’s Toe cannot only cause foot problems but as you will see, it can cause pains all over your body.

     

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler,  Foot Doctor, Podiatrist of Panama City Fl Dr. Burton S. Schuler is a foot doctor, podiatrist, (foot specialist) of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center. He has felt for over 30 years that a very common, but painful, medical condition known as a Morton’s Toe, (Long Second Toe) is the real forgotten reason for knee pain, back pain, hip pain, leg pains, foot pain; and many other problems in millions of people world wide. Dr Schuler says: “People you know suffer everyday with chronic aches and pains from head to toe and don’t know why. Many of them have lost all hope, and believe they will have to live with these pains for the rest of their lives. This is not the case anymore because the Morton’s Toe (Long Second Toe) may be the answer. It is good proven medicine, but most physicians have never heard of it ” Schuler also says “A Morton’s Toe is an abnormality of one bone in the foot (first metatarsal bone) that could be the real unidentified reason (the “medical missing link”) for people’s unending torments and suffering all over there body. A Morton’s Toe can cause leg cramps, (night cramps), fibromyalgia, arthritis, and numerous other problems. Knowing about the Morton’s Toe is important because it offer the public well established medical information about why millions of people suffer everyday with aches and pains , and offers new hope to get rid of problems they believed they would have to live with forever. “. In the 1920′s thru 1950′s Dr. Dudley J. Morton who taught at the Yale and Columbia Medical Schools, and who was considered this country leading authority on the human foot, stated that a problem with one bone in your foot, (Morton’s Toe) was the major reason for most foot problems. Building on his work Dr. Janet Travell, White House physician to President John F. Kennedy, and President Lyndon B. Johnson, and who was also Professor Emeritus of Medicine at George Washington University wrote that Morton’s Toe could also cause pain all over your body. She felt that the Morton’s Toe was so important that at the age of 89, she made a video to teach other doctors about the body wide problems the Morton’s Toe can cause. In his book, Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot, Dr. Burton S. Schuler, tells the reader in a simple and easy way what a Morton’s Toe is, if they have a Morton’s Toe, (Long Second Toe) and how to treat it themselves for about $2-3.00. Along the way, he shows them the excellent medicine the Morton’s Toe is based on and the story of the two very famous physicians who wrote and taught about it for seven decades.

     

    Dr. Burton S. Schuler, is a foot doctor and podiatrist leading authority on the Morton’s Toe Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of the leading book about The Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In the Foot The book is disturbed national by the Cardinal Publishing Group. It will be translated to Greek this Year. Dr. Schuler, graduated from the N. Y. College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care. During his thirty-five year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and many other publications. Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio shows both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management, and the National Board of Podiatric Examiners. Dr. Schuler is a certified a wound specialist from the American Academy of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis). Dr. Burton S. Schuler, Foot Doctor, Podiatrist of Panama City Fl Dr. Burton S. Schuler is a foot doctor, podiatrist, (foot specialist) of Panama City, Fl and the director of the Ambulatory Foot Clinics Podiatric Pain Management Center. He has felt for over 30 years that a very common, but painful, medical condition known as a Morton’s Toe, (Long Second Toe) is the real forgotten reason for knee pain, back pain, hip pain, leg pains, foot pain; and many other problems in millions of people world wide. Dr Schuler says: “People you know suffer everyday with chronic aches and pains from head to toe and don’t know why. Many of them have lost all hope, and believe they will have to live with these pains for the rest of their lives. This is not the case anymore because the Morton’s Toe (Long Second Toe) may be the answer. It is good proven medicine, but most physicians have never heard of it ” Schuler also says “A Morton’s Toe is an abnormality of one bone in the foot (first metatarsal bone) that could be the real unidentified reason (the “medical missing link”) for people’s unending torments and suffering all over there body. A Morton’s Toe can cause leg cramps, (night cramps), fibromyalgia, arthritis, and numerous other problems. Knowing about the Morton’s Toe is important because it offer the public well established medical information about why millions of people suffer everyday with aches and pains , and offers new hope to get rid of problems they believed they would have to live with forever. “. In the 1920′s thru 1950′s Dr. Dudley J. Morton who taught at the Yale and Columbia Medical Schools, and who was considered this country leading authority on the human foot, stated that a problem with one bone in your foot, (Morton’s Toe) was the major reason for most foot problems. Building on his work Dr. Janet Travell, White House physician to President John F. Kennedy, and President Lyndon B. Johnson, and who was also Professor Emeritus of Medicine at George Washington University wrote that Morton’s Toe could also cause pain all over your body. She felt that the Morton’s Toe was so important that at the age of 89, she made a video to teach other doctors about the body wide problems the Morton’s Toe can cause. In his book, Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In The Foot, Dr. Burton S. Schuler, tells the reader in a simple and easy way what a Morton’s Toe is, if they have a Morton’s Toe, (Long Second Toe) and how to treat it themselves for about $2-3.00. Along the way, he shows them the excellent medicine the Morton’s Toe is based on and the story of the two very famous physicians who wrote and taught about it for seven decades. Dr. Burton S. Schuler, is a foot doctor and podiatrist leading authority on the Morton’s Toe Long Second Toe and it associated problems. He is the author of the leading book about The Morton’s Toe, Long Second Toe Why You Really Hurt: It All Starts In the Foot The book is disturbed national by the Cardinal Publishing Group. It will be translated to Greek this Year. Dr. Schuler, graduated from the N. Y. College of Podiatric Medicine in 1975 at the age of twenty-four, and has been in private practice ever since. In 1982, he published his first book, The Agony of De-Feet: A Podiatrist Guide to Foot Care. During his thirty-five year professional career, he has written for Collier’s Encyclopedia and various podiatric journals and publications. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, First in Women, and many other publications. Dr. Schuler has appeared on hundreds of radio shows both here and aboard. He is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management, and the National Board of Podiatric Examiners. Dr. Schuler is a certified a wound specialist from the American Academy of Wound Management. His professional and civic accomplishments have earned his inclusion in the 1999-2002 Who’s Who in America (Marquis). Patients ask me all the time did I get these bunions because I wore the wrong shoe. The answer is not really. A bunion is a bump that forms over a the head of the first metatarsal bone. In most cases, the big toe joint, also known as the 1st metatarsal joint, also is enlarged due to arthritis. The toe also may be pushed toward the second toe At one time or another in their lives, most women will wear some type of shoes that are wrong for them. But only some of them will develop bunions. This is because it is not the shoe causing the bunion (shoes can make it a lot worst) but the foot you were born with. Our old friend the Morton’s Toe is the real reason in many cases. Hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone is one of the things that can cause a Morton’s Toe. If you have hypermobility, it will force the first metatarsal head (bunion bone) to move abnormally. It will cause the front part of the foot or forefoot to have excess tension on a muscle called the Adductor Hallucis. . This irregular tension pulls the Adductor Hallucis tendon away from the second metatarsal head. This is the start of a bunion. The good news is the toe pad can stop this abnormal movement, and save you from having foot surgery.

     

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